Posts Tagged ‘positive attitude’

A key to living a more enjoyable life.

Here we are again, another winter storm on the way.   With the frigid weather I have stayed in most days working on my quilt projects. IMG_4114 When I was sick with a chest cold a few weeks back my husband doted over me for a week, for fear I would end up in the worst possible place-the hospital.  I spent my time reading books and magazines and kept busy the best I could-in spite of not feeling well.  An article in one of the magazines got me thinking about a life changing event I would like to share with you.  Please bear with me if some of this is redundant for some of you.

Each issue of Quilter’s Newsletter magazine, has an article where 4 people respond at length to a certain question.  The question for Feb/March 2014 was, If I could spend a day with a quilter.  I expected people to write about well-known quilters and was  surprised to see that each person wrote about someone who had passed away, someone who impacted their life with quilting.  My thoughts immediately flew to the person who first introduced me to quilting over 30 years ago.  Tears came to my eyes as I thought of my friend, Linda.

IMG_1691

My first quilt. Early 80’s.

I met Linda in my early twenties.  She was just a few years older than me, an  elementary school teacher, who loved “tag-sailing”, and collecting antique things.  Her house was like a museum.  The most memorable thing about Linda was her laugh.  She was one of the happiest people I ever met.  Her eyes even laughed.

Not long after I met her, Linda gave me a personalized quilt block for my anniversary.  I was very intrigued, having never seen anything like it before.  As a result, she offered to show me how to make a simple 9 patch quilt block, like the one in the sampler. (top row, middle block) After her  lesson, I went on to take a quilting class.  Mind you, this was before all the time-saving tools we have today. The class was challenging, but I stayed with it.  In the end, I had this sampler that I still treasure.

Strangely enough, after having made a few quilted items, I gave up quilting for several years to make and sell a variety of hand-made items.  I eventually returned to quilting after remarrying and having my daughter.  I took more classes, and made new friends.  Even though I was busy raising our daughter, and doing child care, I made time to quilt in our cramped little bedroom.

Sewing the binding on my daughters quilt in my tiny sewing area

Sewing the binding on my daughters quilt in my tiny sewing area

After we moved to PA., Linda and I kept in contact mostly at Christmas. This went on for over a decade until one Christmas I received a phone call from her companion telling me Linda had passed away from pancreatic cancer.  I was shocked, and very sad for her 3 children, and for all those who loved this vivacious, happy woman.

Linda’s illness came on her suddenly, her suffering was great, but short.  For many of us, living the rest of our lives with the effects and unpredictability of lupus can be discouraging, even overwhelming.  My purpose for blogging is to encourage us, to plow ahead, into perhaps uncharted territory, and rise above this disease that would seek to rob vitality from our life.  Quilting has helped me in this area.

For me quilting:

  • has helped foster friendships I wouldn’t have otherwise

    Stitch n' Peace Quilt Group Gettysburg Pa.

    Stitch n’ Peace Quilt Group Gettysburg Pa.

  • improves my brain and self-esteem
  • helps me develop persistence, patience, and purpose
  • helps me dominate illness in my life
  • gives me much pleasure, relieves stress, and boredom
  • fills my home with many treasures I get to enjoy

Quilting has allowed me to:

  • show people how much they are loved as they receive a one of a kind gift

    One of the baby quilts for Japan

    One of the baby quilts for Japan

  • send  messages of love and hope to Japan after the tsunami
  • bless babies in Romania at Casa Shalom, and here in Pa. at Tender Care Pregnancy Centers
  • earn money for our family by making doll quilt sets for many little girls

I would love to have the chance to:

  • show Linda my little photo album documenting my journey of quilting.
  • To show her how my abilities have slowly improved over time.
  • To thank her for the wonderful friends I have made.  To tell her how they have helped me grow as a person and  in my ability as a quilter.
  • tell her how crucial quilting has been in helping me rise above the effects of lupus
  • I would like to be able to properly thank her.

We never know how we will impact someones life, and then in a domino affect,  other lives. Working with my hands has been a true lifesaver for me.  Do you have a passion? Or, maybe you are ready to try something new?  Whatever the case, use it to enable yourself to rise above the effects of lupus and make life more enjoyable.dominos

In all fairness, I cannot end this post without recognizing the other people who  were a huge influence in this area.  In high school,  I had a strong inclination toward art, which my father and step-mother were very quick to foster, in the brief time I lived with them.  They really believed in me, which I think gave me confidence to  create in my 20’s.   To this day my step-mother is quick to encourage and support my endeavors, offering wisdom along the way.  And I can’t forget my mother, who has become my biggest quilt cheerleader over the last 10 years. Thank you Dad, Ginny and mom.

In the meantime, borrowing a phrase from Wendy Sheppard, an amazing quilter I follow on-line at Ivory Spring, curious minds want to know, what do you do to dominate your diagnosis?

Until next time,
Many Blessings, Can’t wait to hear from you….Leslie Rose K
For more inspiration  follow me here on PINTEREST.
 
Let the favor  of the Lord our God be upon us,
    and establish the work of our hands upon us;
    yes, establish the work of our hands! Psalm 90:17 ESV
 
 
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30 Posts of enCOURAGEment Post 28

As I begin to wrap up this series, I would like to pull together information scattered throughout my posts on encouraging yourself.  This is meant to get you thinking about what you like, what makes you happy and what could help you through a discouraging time.  Your lists will not look like mine.  You will find other resources.  I hope you will find some valuable suggestions here.

I bumped into a friend  that will have knee surgery soon.  I asked if she had help for after the surgery.  It is a wonderful thing when you need help, and friends and family gather around.  Some bring meals, others take turns driving you to appointments,  someone else helps keep the house clean, and others  cheer you up.  Then there times when you need to be encouraged and  there is no one there to encourage you.  Or, if they are there, they are unaware of the need, or unable to meetDiscouraged_thumb it.

What can we do to remedy that situation?  There are several choices we can make.

  • Give in to self-pity
  • Allow depression to take hold
  • Yield to destructive behavior such as self-medicating
  • Decide to be proactive on own behalf

It is this fourth option I want to write about today.  Whether we have lupus and/or other autoimmune diseases or not, we have all been in this situation.  I would like to share some of the things I have learned while coping with illness.

The information gathering

  • The internet has extensive information on encouragement.
  • If you are a reader, books can offer more details, examples, and Gathering-Information-How-to-Reach-Third-Parties-300x199strategies.  I highly recommend Being Sick Well by Jeffrey H Boyd M.D., M.P.H. It brings you  into the lives of others struggling with health issues and shows you how they cope.
  • Websites that pertain to your particular situation such as The Lupus Foundation of America may  help  in this area.
  • Certain TV programs offer valuable input on how we can help ourselves through different situations.   Oprah has her powerful Lifeclass weekly, which covers a variety of issues on personal growth, and freedom from emotional pain. 
  • People  have life experiences that can help us.  Small groups can be a big help.

Monitor Input

One of the biggest helps or hindrances to our frame of mind and state of emotions is input.  Everything we take in influences how weneg feel.  We need to faithfully guard ourselves against negative influences.  Just like the information in step 1 is helpful, the wrong information is harmful.  We do not want to feed on a steady diet of everything that can happen.  We want to limit exposure to people who make us feel more defeated than before we spoke to them.

Self Discovery

This is the time to figure out what encourages you, makes you happy, or gets your mind off your troubles.  To help you get some ideas here is what I have learned about myself  on this lupus journey.

  • quilting, wool applique, and doing handwork with friends has a way of shifting my attention.   It is really hard to be depressed when my hands are busy making pretty things.  See my Post A Body in Motion for more valuable information.
  • Prayer, the bible and church have lifted my spirits many times when nothing else could.  See Glazed Looks and God for more on this subject.
  • Being around uplifting family and friends does wonders to get my mind off of things.stick_figure_insert_key_black_hole_pc_800_1287
  • I have learned that proper sleep, exercise and eating right make it easier for me to stay upbeat.
  • I have learned about the crucial impact of gratitude on our frame of mind.  See A Grace Journal for more valuable information on this topic.

Action

After making our way through the first three steps, we are ready to carry out some of what we have discovered.  Unlike my friend, who has family and friends  to help her, we may have to be courageous and reach out to people.  We may have to fight guilt as we take quality time for ourselves, keeping in mind it is crucial for our well-being.   No one can do this for us.  Our emotional health impacts our physical well-being just like exercise, sleep and eating right do.  So, the next time you are feeling discouraged, decide what  you want to do to lift your spirits, and do it.  You will be happy you did.

Please read the links to the past blogs. They will give  more practical information and encouragement.  I hope you share  your thoughts with us. Thanks for stopping by.  I pray this blog is a blessing and encouragement to you.  Next time…encouraging others.

Until then,

Many blessings to you.  Leslie Rose K

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Romans 12:12  Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer

30 Posts of enCOURAGEment Post 24

 

Greetings! Well our daughter is home safe and sound and we couldn’t be happier to see her.  Believe it or not it took her almost three days of travel to get back home.   Now she is trying  to adjust to the 12 hour time change.  IMG_3157

I hope you have had a good week and are anxious to read a message from Bill at Unshakeable Hope.  Bill is one of my favorite bloggers.  His posts are rich with insight.  I think he is an amazing man with an amazing story and family. I encourage you to take time some day and explore his blog.   I pray this post on perspective will help you in your journey with lupus or any other autoimmune disease you have to deal with.

 

Having the Right Perspective

I’ve discovered how essential it is to keep things in perspective in order to maintain hope when you’re in the midst of a trial. The first and most important lesson I learned was focusing on what I have and not on what I’ve lost.

blog family pic

Our family before I was diagnosed with ALS. (Mary still had BIG hair).

Perspective: the capacity to view things in their true relations or relative importance. (Webster’s Dictionary)

I know of many people close to my age, even some close friends, who have died of ALS, Cancer and other diseases or were killed in tragic accidents. These moms and dads have missed being able see their children growing up. They weren’t there to take pictures before prom, to watch with pride as their child graduated from high school and/or college or to witness their son or daughter’s wedding.

I force myself to think about these friends and acquaintances when I begin feeling depressed about my inability to fully participate in this thing we call life. At times like last year when my daughter got married, and I was unable to walk her down the aisle or dance with her at the reception. During difficult times like this, I make a conscious effort to think about some of these people that are no longer with us; people like my friend Rick, who died of Cancer, leaving a wife and two teenage sons. I think about another blogger named Patrick, who died of ALS in December leaving a wife and a teenage son and daughter. Sadly, Rick and Patrick won’t get the opportunity to watch with pride as their children go through graduations, weddings and other landmark events in their lives.

I think about these people every time I’m tempted to complain or get depressed about my situation. I ask myself what they’d say to me if I was to complain about things like not being able to walk my daughter down the aisle at her wedding. Would they tell me that I should be grateful for just getting to be there to watch as she walked down the aisle? Of course, Rick, Patrick and the others have gone on to heaven so I don’t know what they might say to me. But I know they would be right if they were able to tell me to be grateful that I was able to be there for all the events that they’ve missed and will miss. In a sense, I feel that I owe them; that, if for no other reason, I must be grateful for their sake.

james and girls

Our son-in-law and daughters (January, 2012).

I know it’s strange for me to imagine what deceased people might say to me (to give me the proper perspective), but it works for me and, regardless of the trial that you find yourself in, we all must find ways of coping; ways of changing our perspective and attitude – ways of convincing ourselves that our life isn’t so bad after all.

“…I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am.” (Philippians 4:11)

The aim of every Christian should be learning to be content in the good times and in the bad times. But, for those that hope in God, contentment does not mean we stop believing for better days ahead; it just means we’re grateful for today and that we’re going to live it to the full – even if we have to live today in a wheelchair!

Wedding

“For in hope we have been saved, but hope that is seen is not hope; for who hopes for what he already sees? But if we hope for what we do not see, with perseverance we wait eagerly for it.” (Romans 8:24-25)

Taken directly from Unshakeable Hope with permission.

Thank you Bill for letting me share part of your story here.  To read more about Bill’s life story click here.

I welcome your comments.  Until next time….Leslie Rose K

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Romans 12:12  Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer.

30 Posts of enCOURAGEment Post19

Lupus, like many other autoimmune diseases, can easily change a person’s whole life around.  It is easy to slip into a rut or a specific mindset that does not bear good fruit in our lives.  It can even make things worse without us realizing it.

A few months ago, while sitting in my living room, my eye caught the light switch plate near the front door.  light-switch-coversI was embarrassed by what I saw there.  Silver, decomposing duck tape covering one half of the plate.  That tape was put there quickly, years ago, for a very good purpose, but it had become extremely unsightly and I didn’t even see it any more.

I was struck by the notion that there are things in my life that others see, but I do not notice anymore.  Things changethat need to be changed or updated.  While the tape kept us from shutting off power to the top half of all our living room outlets, it definitely needed to be changed.

This proved to be no quick task.  First, I had to get the cover off the wall.  Then, it was a chore to scrape off the hardened tape.  I had to get the Goop out to remove all the hardened glue.  I had to  soak it, rub it, soak it, and rub it some more, until it eventually came clean.  Black electrical tape would have been an ideal replacement, but that day I had to settle for blue painter’s tape.

What is in your life that you do not notice anymore because of chronic illness?   I had to work on attitude, exercise and weight.  I tackled them one by one, in that order.  I put enough time between adding challenges so each would become habit, and build  on the other.  I wish I could say it is easy, but like getting that crusty old tape off the light switch cover, it is taking lots of elbow 2 changegrease.  Two years later, I do not know if others see the difference, but I do.  Best of all, I feel the difference.  Unlike the light switch cover, this is an ongoing process that I must stay on top of, or I could find myself  back where I started.

I encourage you to gather up the courage, look around your life, and see if there is something that needs to be updated or changed.  Maybe even ask a trusted friend or spouse for input.  The great news is, if I can do it , you can do it.  You won’t be disappointed, especially when you start feeling the results in your body.

Change_is_good_by_biswajittukaNext time, you will meet guest blogger Adam, diagnosed with lupus in 2006. You will get to read about the unique, huge challenge he undertook this year.

Until then….Many blessings, Leslie Rose K

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Romans 12:12  Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer.

30 posts of enCOURAGEment Post 18

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Many Blessings, Leslie Rose K

30 Posts of enCOURAGEment post 16



The Old Fisherman

A True Story by Mary Bartels Bray

Our house was directly across the street from the clinic entrance of John Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. We lived downstairs and rented the upstairs rooms to out-patients at the clinic. One summer evening as I was fixing supper, there was a knock at the door. I opened it to see a truly awful looking man. “Why, he’s hardly taller than my eight-year-old,” I thought as I stared at the stooped, shriveled body. But the appalling thing was his face – lopsided from swelling, red and raw.

Yet his voice was pleasant as he said, “Good evening. I’ve come to see if you’ve a room for just one night. I came for a treatment this morning from the eastern shore, and there’s no bus ’til morning. “He told me he’d been hunting for a room since noon but with no success, no one seemed to have a room. “I guess it’s my face… I know it looks terrible, but the doctor says with a few more treatments…”

For a moment I hesitated, but his next words convinced me: “I could sleep in this rocking chair on the porch. My bus leaves early in the morning.”

I told him we would find him a bed, but to rest on the porch. I went inside and finished getting supper. When we were ready, I asked the old man if he would join us. “No thank you. I have plenty.” And he held up a brown paper bag. When I had finished the dishes, I went out on the porch to talk with him a few minutes. It didn’t take a long time to see that this old man had an oversized heart crowded into that tiny body. He told me he fished for a living to support his daughter, her five children, and her husband, who was hopelessly crippled from a back injury. He didn’t tell it by way of complaint. In fact, every other sentence was prefaced with a thanks to God for a blessing. He was grateful that no pain accompanied his disease, which was apparently a form of skin cancer. He thanked God for giving him the strength to keep going.

At bedtime, we put a camp cot in the children’s room for him. When I got up in the morning, the bed linens were neatly folded and the little man was out on the porch. He refused breakfast, but just before he left for his bus, haltingly, as if asking a great favor, he said, “Could I please come back and stay the next time I have a treatment? I won’t put you out a bit. I can sleep fine in a chair.” He paused a moment and then added, “Your children made me feel at home. Grownups are bothered by my face, but children don’t seem to mind.” I told him he was welcome to come again.

And on his next trip he arrived a little after seven in the morning. As a gift, he brought a big fish and a quart of the largest oysters I had ever seen. He said he had shucked them that morning before he left so that they’d be nice and fresh. I knew his bus left at 4:00 am, and wondered what time he had to get up in order to do this for us.

In the years he came to stay overnight with us there was never a time that he did not bring us fish or oysters or vegetables from his garden. Other times we received packages in the mail, always by special delivery; fish or oysters packed in a box of fresh young spinach or kale, every leaf carefully washed. Knowing that he must walk three miles to mail these, and knowing how little money he had made the gifts doubly precious.

When I received these little remembrances, I often thought of a comment our next-door neighbor made after he left that first morning. “Did you keep that awful looking man last night? I turned him away! You can lose roomers by putting up such people!” Maybe we did lose roomers once or twice. But oh! If only they could have known him, perhaps their illness would have been easier to bear. I know our family always will be grateful to have known him; from him we learned what it was to accept the bad without complaint and the good with gratitude to God.

Recently I was visiting a friend who has a greenhouse. As she showed me her flowers, we came to the most beautiful one of all, a golden chrysanthemum, bursting with blooms. But to my great surprise, it was growing in an old dented, rusty bucket. I thought to myself, “If this were my plant, I’d put it in the loveliest container I had!” My friend changed my mind. “I ran short of pots,” she explained, “and knowing how beautiful this one would be, I thought it wouldn’t mind starting out in this old pail. It’s just for a little while, till I can put it out in the garden.” She must have wondered why I laughed so delightedly, but I was imagining just such a scene in Heaven. “Here’s an especially beautiful one,” God might have said when he came to the soul of the sweet old fisherman. “He won’t mind starting in this small body.”

All this happened long ago – and now, in God’s garden, how tall this lovely soul must stand.

——-

Our Lives are not determined by what happened to us, but by how we react to what happens, not by what life brings us but by the attitude we bring to life. A positive attitude causes a chain reaction of positive thoughts, events, and outcomes. It is a catalyst, a spark that creates extraordinary results.

Old FishermanReblogged from Inspire21.com
Many blessings, Leslie Rose K
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Romans 12:12  Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer.


30 Posts of enCOURAGEment post 14

Two or three years ago, I saw a movie that opened my eyes to the plight of people in a country completely unfamiliar to me.  The godgrewmovie God Grew Tired of Us tells the heartbreaking story of the lost boys of Sudan.  Eventually, some were able to come to the United States as  refugees and make a new life for themselves.  John Bul Dau was one of those boys.

John Bul Dau, along with many others, lived through horrific experiences and tragedy that are forever etched on their memories.  At the age of 13 John found himself leader of 1200 young boys, as thousands journeyed  across the desert fleeing for their lives.  It is a story like no other.  What John endured gave him every right to be a bitter, angry man but he would have none of it.  Instead, he became an activist and humanitarian.

His life, once one of despair and desperation, became one of dedication to help his people here, and abroad.  He is an example of a courageous leader and faithful encourager.

dau_9297_200x150

Click here for Video

What are you going through today?  Has lupus or another autoimmune disease got you down? Are you despairing?  There is one way to cope without being consumed by the trial that  plagues you, sickness or otherwise, and that is hope.  Turn your eyes toward hope.

Hope ever tells us tomorrow will be better. Tibullus  This is not a cliché.  Shifting our attention to the positive will reap positive things in our life, no matter what we are going through.  I have written about this in many posts but you can go here for a cornucopia of articles about how being positive reduces stress and  impacts your life.

John turns his eyes toward hope every day on behalf of his country and his people.  He has not allowed what he went through to ruin the rest of his life.  You will be encouraged as you read about this amazing man from National Geographics  here.

All4

A few of the boys

You can also watch the movie free here on Hulu at your leisure.

I hope you have been encouraged today. Many blessings, Leslie Rose K

Romans 12:12  Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer.

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http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/01/19/AR2007011901571.html

http://movies.nytimes.com/2007/01/12/movies/12tire.html?scp=3&sq=john+dau&st=nyt&_r=0

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where treasures of past and present connect

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Kindness Images, Videos, True Life Stories, Quotes, Personal Reflections and Meditations.

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Unshakable Hope

“May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you will abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” (Romans 15:13)

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